Saint Andronik Bishop of Kyoto (Japan) and Perm (Russia), Hieromartyr in Russia, from Povodnevo, Yaroslavl, Russia (+1918)  – June 4, June 6, June 7 and July 7

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JAPAN OF MY HEART

Saint Andronik Bishop of Kyoto (Japan) and Perm (Russia), Hieromartyr in Russia, from Povodnevo, Yaroslavl, Russia (+1918)

June 4, June 6, June 7 and July 7

Archbishop Andronik (August 1, 1870 – July 7, 1918), was a bishop in the Russian Orthodox Church and a saint, glorified as Hieromartyr Andronik, Archbishop of Perm in 2000.

Archbishop Andronik was born as Vladimir Nikolsky, on August 1, 1870, in Povodnevo, a village in Myshkin uyezd, Yaroslavl diocese. His father was a deacon in the Russian Orthodox Church. After he finished his studies at the Yaroslavl Seminary in 1891, he entered the Moscow Theological Academy. On August 1, 1893, during his studies in Moscow, he was tonsured a monk and given the religious name of Andronik. He was ordained to the diaconate on August 6 of that same year. On July 22, 1895, he was ordained as a priest.

From 1895, Andronik was assigned first to the theological seminary of Kutaisi in Georgia and then at the seminary at Ardon as inspector and instructor.

In 1897, Andronik was assigned as a member of the Russian Orthodox mission to the Empire of Japan, under Bishop Nikolai (Kasatkin), later glorified as St. Nicholas of Japan, to assist him in his missionary work, which he began 1861. Hieromonk Andronik was very surprised by this assignment and felt inadequate for the position, but ultimately he accepted it as God’s will. His journey began in St. Petersburg, on September 21, 1897, and continued from Odessa with Archimandrite Sergius (Stragorodsky) on October 26. Traveling through European countries and the United States, they arrived in Japan on December 26. He wrote and published a book about this journey, A Missionary Journey to Japan (published in Kazan, Russia in 1899).

On November 5, 1906, Andronik was consecrated as the first Bishop of Kyoto, which became the seat of the West Japan Diocese of the Japanese Orthodox Church. Although Bishop Andronik was the bishop of Kyoto, he lived in Osaka which, while it then was the second largest city in Japan, was also where most of Orthodox faithful lived. After he arrived in Osaka, he began to feel ill and found performing his duties difficult. After serving in Osaka for three months, he asked leave to resign and to depart from Japan. On May 27, 1907, he left Japan and returned to Russia. There, he was assigned on October 26 to be the deputy to Bishop Eulogius of Kholm. In 1908, he was assigned bishop of Tikhvin in Novgorod diocese.

On July 30, 1914, Andronik was appointed bishop of Perm and Solikamsk. Eleven days before, on July 19, World War I began. As the war progressed, he worked energetically for one and a half million inhabitants and 570 churches in this region.

In summer 1916, Andronik traveled to the Imperial Russian Army headquarters outside St. Petersburg where Tsar Nicholas II was leading the army. The purpose of this trip was to warn the Tsar about Rasputin. However, the Tsar would not take him seriously and his trip failed. But Nicholas II was pleased with the gift Bishop Andronik gave him on behalf of the people, a pair of soldier’s boots that the province of Perm provided the army.

In 1917, Andronik became Bishop of Perm and Kungur, and became one of the seven hierarchs in the pre-conciliar synod preparing for the Local Council of the Russian Church in Moscow. He was very active throughout the council, from August 1917 until April 1918, which was the end of the second session of the Council. As the agitation of the Bolshevik take-over intensified on January 25, 1918, Bishop Adronik made a written appeal to the faithful to defend the heritage of the Church from the aggressors and looters as attacks became more frequent.

Andronik was a firm supporter of the Tsar. From his point of view, it was God’s will that the anointed Tsar should reign over the empire; hence, the monarchy was an appropriate governmental system for Christians. But this did not mean he supported tyranny: the Tsar should listen to his people, and the monarch and the people should come to peace.

In February, in the Perm region, the Bolsheviks began to loot churches and monasteries. When the second session of the Council ended, Andronic returned to Perm. Patriarch Tikhon had elevated him to archbishop on April 25, Palm Sunday. On Holy Thursday, April 16, the Bolsheviks carried out a search of his residence. He remained calm and continued the services of Holy Week and Pascha (Easter).

The Bolshevik authorities increased pressure on the church in the following weeks. Finally Archbishop Andronik was arrested at midnight on July 4. In response, the clergy in Perm went on strike from the night he was arrested until July 13, halting all divine services in the region except baptism and the last rites for the dying. There are various accounts of his death. The apparently most consistent says that on July 7, 1918 he was taken to the forest and forced to dig his own grave. After lying down in it, he was covered with earth and shots were fired into the dirt.

In 2000, the Russian Orthodox Church glorified him as Hieromartyr Andronik, Archbishop Of Perm, one of the Russian New Martyrs and Confessors. His feast day is July 7.

Source: Wikipedia

Woman and children New-Martyrs in Syria (+2019) – May 12

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ORTHODOX WEB

Woman and children New-Martyrs in Syria on May 12, 2019

Saint Martyr Longinus the Centurion, who stood at the Cross of the Lord (+1st century) – October 16

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HEAVEN ON EARTH – ORTHODOXY

Saint Martyr Longinus the Centurion,

who stood at the Cross of the Lord (+1st century)

October 16

Source:

http://oca.org

ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

The Holy Martyr Longinus the Centurion, a Roman soldier, served in Judea under the command of the Governor, Pontius Pilate. When our Savior Jesus Christ was crucified, it was the detachment of soldiers under the command of Longinus which stood watch on Golgotha, at the very foot of the holy Cross. Longinus and his soldiers were eyewitnesses of the final moments of the earthly life of the Lord, and of the great and awesome portents that appeared at His death. These events shook the centurion’s soul. Longinus believed in Christ and confessed before everyone, “Truly this was the Son of God” (Mt. 27:54).

According to Church Tradition, Longinus was the soldier who pierced the side of the Crucified Savior with a spear, and received healing from an eye affliction when blood and water poured forth from the wound.

After the Crucifixion and Burial of the Savior, Longinus stood watch with his company at the Sepulchre of the Lord. These soldiers were present at the All-Radiant Resurrection of Christ. The Jews bribed them to lie and say that His disciples had stolen away the Body of Christ, but Longinus and two of his comrades refused to be seduced by the Jewish gold. They also refused to Continue reading “Saint Martyr Longinus the Centurion, who stood at the Cross of the Lord (+1st century) – October 16”

Saint John of Damascus, Syria (+780) – December 4

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SAINT JOHN DAMASCENE

Saint John of Damascus, Syria (+780)

December 4

Source:

https://oca.org

https://oca.org/saints/lives/2016/12/04/103473-martyr-john-of-damascus

ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

Saint John of Damascus was born about the year 680 at Damascus, Syria into a Christian family. His father, Sergius Mansur, was a treasurer at the court of the Caliph. John had also a foster brother, the orphaned child Cosmas (October 14), whom Sergius had taken into his own home. When the children were growing up, Sergius saw that they received a good education. At the Damascus slave market he ransomed the learned monk Cosmas of Calabria from captivity and entrusted to him the teaching of his children. The boys displayed uncommon ability and readily mastered their courses of the secular and spiritual sciences. After the death of his father, John occupied ministerial posts at court and became the city prefect.

In Constantinople at that time, the heresy of Iconoclasm had arisen and quickly spread, supported by the emperor Leo III the Isaurian (717-741). Rising up in defense of the Orthodox veneration of icons [Iconodoulia], Saint John wrote three treatises entitled, “Against Those who Revile the Holy Icons.” The wise and God-inspired writings of Saint John enraged the emperor. But since the author was not a Byzantine subject, the emperor was unable to lock him up in prison, or to execute him. The emperor then resorted to slander. A forged letter to the emperor was produced, supposedly from John, in which the Damascus official was supposed to have offered his help to Leo in conquering the Syrian capital.

This letter and another hypocritically flattering note were sent to the Saracen Caliph by Leo the Isaurian. The Caliph immediately ordered that Saint John be Continue reading “Saint John of Damascus, Syria (+780) – December 4”